American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols  &  Dr. Doug Arbittier

 

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American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols & Dr. Doug Arbittier

2011 - "The sesqui-centennial of the Civil War" -  2015

The 150th Year Celebration

 

 Home page  |   Feedback & Contact Dr. Echols  |  SEARCH this site   |  Article Indexes   |   Medical Faculty & Authors

 Civil War Medical Books  |  Medicine Containers   |   1800's & Civil War Surgery Set Displays

Medical College Index - Lecture Cards  |  Civil War Medical Book Author-Title Index

Wanted to Purchase: Items like those on this website, including Civil War surgeon uniforms, medical books, CDV's, surgeon images, diaries, and related medical items ... Contact

Dr. Echols' partial list of Google books for Civil War Surgeon Research

 

George Cowles Osgood, M.D.

U.S. Navy Assistant Surgeon Application

 

By Norman L. Herman, M.D., Ph.D.

The following is a dictated translation of the hand-written application to the U. S. Navy Examination Board during the Civil War by a civilian physician/surgeon for a position as a medical officer in the Federal Navy or for promotion to Assistant Surgeon by an Acting Assistant Surgeon.  The actual applications are in the possession of the author and presented to enlighten the general public and other researchers as to the education process before and during the Civil War, the personal history of the applicants, as well as to show their personal level of medical knowledge in answering the questions asked by the Navy Board of Examiners.  (Some applicants failed to pass and did not serve or served in the Union Army.)

This written presentation was first of a part of a two-part exam consisting of a written exam and an oral exam.   Many of these applications are rich with highly detailed medical content offering an interesting perspective on the medical knowledge and practices of the period.  A broad sampling of these exams is presented to give you a 'picture' of the type of applicant being examined and admitted to or rejected by the Federal Navy in 1863.   Much more detail on the individuals and their personal and naval history will be presented in a forth-coming book by Dr. Herman.

(The actual written exam photos are available, but not presented on these pages due to the size of the files.  An example of a hand-written exam is on the 'List of all Applicants' page)

If you have additional information or images for any of these doctors, please contact us.

A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

 


Applicant: George Cowles Osgood, M.D.

                                          

Charlestown Navy Yard

Charlestown Mass.

February 21st 1863.

Surgeon Ruschenberger,

                    

Dear Sir,

                             

I was born in West Newbury Mass. on the 23rd of December 1838.  My parents’ names are John and Dorcas Osgood.  My father is dead, my mother now lives in this City.

 

Attended the Public Schools in Lowell Mass. more or less of the time for seven or eight years.

On the 6th day of June 1856, I connected myself with H. W. Allen, of Lowell Mass. as an assistant in in [sic] the Apothecary business and have been with him, in the same capacity since that time until the present.  On the first of January 1860, I commenced the Study of Medicine, with the Nathan Allen M.D. of Lowell Mass.

 

I attended the regular course of Lectures at “Harvard Medical College” in the City of Boston Mass, during the winter of 1861 & 2, and I have also attended the Lectures at the same Institution during the present winter.

I have followed closely the Clinical Lectures and visits, of Drs. Bowditch and Shattuck at the Mass. Gen.  Hospital, during the winter of /61 & /62 and the present winter, also similar exercises by Surgeon H. J. Bigelow.

 

I have frequently visited the “U.S. Marine Hospital” in Chelsea Mass. and the “Dispensary” in Boston Mass.

My health was never better than at present time.

                                           

I am respectfully

Your obedient Servant

George Cowles Osgood.

 


Questions by the Board:

 

Dr. George C. Osgood is requested to write answers to the following questions.

                 1.  What is meant by chemical affinity?

                 2.  How are cathartics medicines classified therapeutically; name one of each class?

                 3.  How is concussion distinguished from compression of the brain?

                 4.  What glands and glandular organs take part in the process of digestion?

                 5.  What are the diagnostic symptoms of dysentery?

                 6.  What is the origin, course and distribution of right subclavian artery?

 


Answers by Osgood:

 

1.  The mutual attraction which particles have for each other when brought in contact.  The chemical attraction between them.

 

2.  Those which act upon the small, and those which act upon the large intestine.  Rhubarb acts upon the small intestine Aloes acts upon the large intestine.

 

3.  Salivary, mucous glands of Stomach, The Liver and Pancreas, and Mesenteric glands.

 

4.  In the first the substance of the brain is not injured, in the second it usualy [sic] is.

 

5.  Griping pain in umbilical region, watery stools, and in advanced stages may be more or less bloody, frequent discharges with tenesmus.

 

6.  It arises from the Arteria Innominata, then passes obliquely outwards and upwards beneath the right clavicle and behind it for 3 or 4 inches until it arrives at the Scapular end of clavicle or near the outer third of the clavicle then passes downwards and outwards in front of the first rib and then passes to the Axilla and forms the Axillary Artery giving off in its course the internal mammary and two intercostal arteries, also the inferior Thyroid and Vertebral arteries.  It is shorter than left subclavian.

 

February 21st 1863.

                                                                           

George C. Osgood.

 

[Board note in very light pencil]: This candidate is slow but is tolerably posted, in all the branches; his weak point is in practice, never having had any, or seen any except at lecture.


A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

Medical Antiques Index

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques Index
 

Contact Dr. Arbittier or Dr. Echols

 

 

Civil War Medical Collections 

 

Direct links to all medical & Civil War collections on this site                         

American Surgical Sets:

Pre-Civil War:  1 | 2  -   Post-Civil War:  3  -  Civil War 1861-1865:  4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   INDEX

Medical Text-Books:

1 | 1a | 2 | 2a | 3 | 3a | 4 | 4a | 5 | 5a | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 9a | 10 | 11 | 12    INDEX

Surgeon General's Office Library printed catalogues: 1840 | 1864 | 1865
Medical Lecture Cards: 1 | 2 | 34 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21    INDEX

Medical Faculty and Authors:

INDEX

Navy Surgeon Exams:

1863 Navy Surgeon Applicant Exams with Biographies   INDEX ONE | INDEX TWO

Surgeon CDVs, Images:

Army: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8    INDEX

Navy: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   

Hosp Dep't Bottles, Tins, 

U.S. Army Pannier:

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Please request permission before commercial use or publication of any content or photos on this site and credit any use with:  "American Civil War Surgical Antiques"   All content and all original photography on this Web Site is copyrighted 1995 - 2015 and may not be used on any other web site or in commercial print without the expressed e-mail permission from Dr. Arbittier:  Contact   All rights reserved. 

 

Students doing reports or projects are welcome to use the content of this site without permission, but credits would be appreciated.

 

Please note: information on this site may not be normally referenced as this is an active and long-term educational research project.  Personal notes may not be properly cited for publication.  Various articles are digitally reproduced under the 'fair-use act' of the copyright laws and are intended for educational purposes only.  Many citations are from Google digital 'books' and can be traced backwards via a search of a unique string in the citation.

 

 Arbittier Museum of Medical History Tour:   1 | 2 | 3

 

Last update: Monday, December 12, 2016