American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols  &  Dr. Doug Arbittier

 

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American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols & Dr. Doug Arbittier

2011 - "The sesqui-centennial of the Civil War" -  2015

The 150th Year Celebration

 

 Home page  |   Feedback & Contact Dr. Echols  |  SEARCH this site   |  Article Indexes   |   Medical Faculty & Authors

 Civil War Medical Books  |  Medicine Containers   |   1800's & Civil War Surgery Set Displays

Medical College Index - Lecture Cards  |  Civil War Medical Book Author-Title Index

Wanted to Purchase: Items like those on this website, including Civil War surgeon uniforms, medical books, CDV's, surgeon images, diaries, and related medical items ... Contact

Dr. Echols' partial list of Google books for Civil War Surgeon Research

 

Charles H. Page, M.D. 

U.S. Navy Assistant Surgeon Application

 

By Norman L. Herman, M.D., Ph.D.

The following is a dictated translation of the hand-written application to the U. S. Navy Examination Board during the Civil War by a civilian physician/surgeon for a position as a medical officer in the Federal Navy or for promotion to Assistant Surgeon by an Acting Assistant Surgeon.  The actual applications are in the possession of the author and presented to enlighten the general public and other researchers as to the education process before and during the Civil War, the personal history of the applicants, as well as to show their personal level of medical knowledge in answering the questions asked by the Navy Board of Examiners.  (Some applicants failed to pass and did not serve or served in the Union Army.)

This written presentation was first of a part of a two-part exam consisting of a written exam and an oral exam.   Many of these applications are rich with highly detailed medical content offering an interesting perspective on the medical knowledge and practices of the period.  A broad sampling of these exams is presented to give you a 'picture' of the type of applicant being examined and admitted to or rejected by the Federal Navy in 1863.   Much more detail on the individuals and their personal and naval history will be presented in a forth-coming book by Dr. Herman.

(The actual written exam photos are available, but not presented on these pages due to the size of the files.  An example of a hand-written exam is on the 'List of all Applicants' page)

If you have additional information or images for any of these doctors, please contact us.

A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

 


Applicant: Charles H. Page, M.D.

 

U.S.  Navy Yard,

Charlestown Mass.  Aug 25, 1862

 

Dr. Rouchenberger,

                                  

Sir,

                                          

I was born in Concord, New Hampshire, Oct 2nd 1840 at which city I received my early education.  When I was 12 years of age I attended a select school at Wearre, N. H. at which place I remained two months, from this place I went to Hopkinton N. H. at which place I remained a long time.  from this school I went to New London.  I graduated from this Institution, having fitted for College.  Instead of entering College I began the study of Medicine and went into the office of C. P. Gage M.D. at Concord, N. H.  I began my studies in March 1860 with “Pomcoasts Wiston” and “Arnotts Elements of Physics”. 

 

I attended Lectures at the “Dartmouth Medical College” which commenced its annual session Aug. 2nd. 1861.  At the close of the term I returned to Concord and prosecuted my studies.  I had the advantages of Practical Anatomy last Spring at Concord.  Last May I went into the U.S. Marine Hospital at Chelsea Mass. as Student; under L.W. Graves M.D. at which place I have resided since, having the advantages that such a position affords.

 

Yours Respectfully,

      

Surg.  U. S. N.  Yard                   

Charles H. Page

Charlestown, Mass.

 


Questions by the Board:

 

Dr.  C. H. Page is requested to right answers to the following questions.

     1.What symptoms distinguished dysentery, diarrhea, and enteritis?

     2. What are the operative means for treating retention of urine?

     3. Define the terms “specific gravity”, “center of gravity”, and gravitation?

     4. How all our cathartics classified therapeutically?

     5. At what temperatures is the density of water greatest?

     6. How was food converted into nutritious material by the organs which constitute the apparatus of digestion?

 


Answers by Page:

 

1  Symptoms of Dysentery; Profuse discharge “per anum” sometimes amounting to 20 or 30 stools a day.  Dull heavy pain over track of colon, with weak fluttering pulse, and extreme prostration with emaciation.  Distinguished from Diarrhoea by nature of stools.  In Dysentery, at first firm, changing to soft pasty, mucus, serous, bloody.  In Diarrhoea, watery and not so numerous.  In Dysentery disease of it colon with pain resulting.  In Diarrhoea affection of the Rectum with absence of pain in abdomen, as also of the “Tenesmus” attending Dysentery.  Distinguished from Enteritis by the discharge which is usually absent in Enteritis it having a tendency to Constipation which is often the cause of Enteritis.  In Dysentery we have a soft, flaccid abdomen rather than the swollen, tymomitic, and tender one of Enteritis.

 

2  Catheter, Knife; either through Rectum or Abdominal parietes, Perineum.

 

3  The chemical weight of a substance.

Water usually taken as a standard 1000.

A substance so placed that the Atmospheric pressure would exert its proper influence upon it would be said to have its “Centre of Gravity”   Balanced.

The falling of a substance is called its “Gravitation”, or rather the force or weight with which it Gravitates or settles.

 

4  Laxatives, Purgatives, Hydrogogus, Vegetable and Saline are the primary classification which are divided into the former.

 

5  I don’t remember the degree, but know that after being cold to a certain temperature, additional cold causes it to expand.

 

6  Food is taken through the mouth, masticated, mixed with the product of the Parotid, Submaxillary, and Sublingual Glands, swallowed, received in the Stomach, mixed with “Gastric Juice”, passed into the Duodenum, where the Pancreatic Juice and Bile are mingled with it, passed into the Jejunum, Ileum, Cecum, Colon, Rectum. along its course the nutritive matter is taken up by the Lacteals in the form of Chyle, passed into the Receptaculum chyli, up the Thoracic Duct, into the Left Subclavian Vein, then into the Right Auricle of the Heart, then to the Right Ventricle, thence through the pulmonary Artery to the lungs.  Thence into the Left Auricle, from thence to the Left Ventricle ready for distribution.  The unassimilated matter is passed off to the rectum, sphincter ani.

 

Charles H. Page

August 25th 1862


A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

Medical Antiques Index

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques Index
 

Contact Dr. Arbittier or Dr. Echols

 

 

Civil War Medical Collections 

 

Direct links to all medical & Civil War collections on this site                         

American Surgical Sets:

Pre-Civil War:  1 | 2  -   Post-Civil War:  3  -  Civil War 1861-1865:  4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   INDEX

Medical Text-Books:

1 | 1a | 2 | 2a | 3 | 3a | 4 | 4a | 5 | 5a | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 9a | 10 | 11 | 12    INDEX

Surgeon General's Office Library printed catalogues: 1840 | 1864 | 1865
Medical Lecture Cards: 1 | 2 | 34 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21    INDEX

Medical Faculty and Authors:

INDEX

Navy Surgeon Exams:

1863 Navy Surgeon Applicant Exams with Biographies   INDEX ONE | INDEX TWO

Surgeon CDVs, Images:

Army: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8    INDEX

Navy: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   

Hosp Dep't Bottles, Tins, 

U.S. Army Pannier:

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Please request permission before commercial use or publication of any content or photos on this site and credit any use with:  "American Civil War Surgical Antiques"   All content and all original photography on this Web Site is copyrighted 1995 - 2015 and may not be used on any other web site or in commercial print without the expressed e-mail permission from Dr. Arbittier:  Contact   All rights reserved. 

 

Students doing reports or projects are welcome to use the content of this site without permission, but credits would be appreciated.

 

Please note: information on this site may not be normally referenced as this is an active and long-term educational research project.  Personal notes may not be properly cited for publication.  Various articles are digitally reproduced under the 'fair-use act' of the copyright laws and are intended for educational purposes only.  Many citations are from Google digital 'books' and can be traced backwards via a search of a unique string in the citation.

 

 Arbittier Museum of Medical History Tour:   1 | 2 | 3

 

Last update: Monday, December 12, 2016