American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols  &  Dr. Doug Arbittier

 

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American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Surgical Set collection from 1860 to 1865 - Civilian and Military

Civil War:  Medicine, Surgeon Education & Medical Textbooks

 Dr. Michael Echols & Dr. Doug Arbittier

2011 - "The sesqui-centennial of the Civil War" -  2015

The 150th Year Celebration

 

 Home page  |   Feedback & Contact Dr. Echols  |  SEARCH this site   |  Article Indexes   |   Medical Faculty & Authors

 Civil War Medical Books  |  Medicine Containers   |   1800's & Civil War Surgery Set Displays

Medical College Index - Lecture Cards  |  Civil War Medical Book Author-Title Index

Wanted to Purchase: Items like those on this website, including Civil War surgeon uniforms, medical books, CDV's, surgeon images, diaries, and related medical items ... Contact

Dr. Echols' partial list of Google books for Civil War Surgeon Research

 

Isaac Poole, M.D.

U.S. Navy Assistant Surgeon Application

 

By Norman L. Herman, M.D., Ph.D.

The following is a dictated translation of the hand-written application to the U. S. Navy Examination Board during the Civil War by a civilian physician/surgeon for a position as a medical officer in the Federal Navy or for promotion to Assistant Surgeon by an Acting Assistant Surgeon.  The actual applications are in the possession of the author and presented to enlighten the general public and other researchers as to the education process before and during the Civil War, the personal history of the applicants, as well as to show their personal level of medical knowledge in answering the questions asked by the Navy Board of Examiners.  (Some applicants failed to pass and did not serve or served in the Union Army.)

This written presentation was first of a part of a two-part exam consisting of a written exam and an oral exam.   Many of these applications are rich with highly detailed medical content offering an interesting perspective on the medical knowledge and practices of the period.  A broad sampling of these exams is presented to give you a 'picture' of the type of applicant being examined and admitted to or rejected by the Federal Navy in 1863.   Much more detail on the individuals and their personal and naval history will be presented in a forth-coming book by Dr. Herman.

(The actual written exam photos are available, but not presented on these pages due to the size of the files.  An example of a hand-written exam is on the 'List of all Applicants' page)

If you have additional information or images for any of these doctors, please contact us.

A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

 


Applicant: Isaac Poole, M.D.

 

Navy Yard, Charlestown,

Nov. 20th 1863.

 

Dr. Ruschenberger

 

Dear Sir,

                                                                          

I was born in Halifax, Plymouth County, Mass., July 26th., 1837.  I fitted for College at Plympton Academy but did not enter for several reasons.  My preceptor was Josiah Hammond M.D. of Plympton Mass. and I received my diploma from Berkshire Medical College, Pittsfield, Mass.  I have attended to all the sick in King’s Co Lunatic Asylum for the past year.

                       

Most Resp. Yours

Isaac Poole.

34 Cherry St.

Cambridge port 

Mass.

 


Questions by the Board:

 

Dr. Isaac Poole is requested to write answers to the following questions? [sic]

                            1.  What blood vessels are divided in amputating at the shoulder joint?

                            2.  What is chyle, how was it formed, and what purpose does it serve?

                            3.  What parts enter into the composition of the knee joint?

                            4.  What are the diagnostic symptoms of typhoid fever?

                            5.  What are the officinal preparations of sodium and the dose of each?

                            6.  What substances result from the chemical combination of oxygen and nitrogen?

 


Answers by Poole:

 

1.  Axillary artery also the Supra-Scapular, the Transverse Colli, and the Circumflex arteries, the Subclavian, the Basilic and the Cephalic veins.

                           

2.  Chyle is the fluid which is taken up by the lacteals and conveyed by them from the intestines to the Thoracic duct which empties it into the Subclavian vein.

I believe there are difference theories in regard to the subject.  Food when taken into the mouth is divided by the teeth and moistened by the Saliva.  It then passes through Pharynx [sic] and esophagus into the stomach.  Its presence excites the muscles to action and the food is rolled from one part of the organ to the other.  In its journey it becomes moistened by the gastric juice which digests the albuminoid elements, and nothing else.  All starch and sugar and fat passes into the duodenum unchanged.  If adipose tissue enters the stomach the cellular tissue is digested and the oil globules are set free but are not changed at all in their condition.  Passing into the duodenum and other small intestines the starch and sugar are digested by the intestinal juices and the fat by the pancreatic juice.  The fat is not changed in its chemical constitution but simply “emulsioned” so that the lacteals can absorb it which it is their special duty to perform.  The other portions of the food are taken up by the minute blood vessels which line the intestine.  The nutritive elements of the food undergo further changes in the vessels by which they are absorbed by which they are assimilated to the various tissues of body of which there destined to form a part.

                        

3.  The lower extremity of the femur the upper extremity of the tibia and the patella.  The Rectus Femoris Vastus Internus and Externus, Crureus and Sub. Crureus Biceps Femoris, Sartorius Semi-Tendinosus Semi-Membranosus Popliteus  and Gastrocnemius Muscles, and from fifteen to eighteen ligaments.

                        

4.  Stupor – debility – swelling of the abdomen – the dry-fissured tongue.  The peculiar rose colored spots on the abdomen

                        

5.  Chloride of Sodium – dose from 10 to 40 grains.  Bicarbonate of soda – dose 10 to 20 grs –

                        

6.  Nitric Acid

                                                       

Isaac Poole.

Nov.  20th, 1863.


A list with links to all applicants in this survey of U.S. Navy Applicants for 1863

Example of a handwritten exam given by the Navy Examination Board

Medical Antiques Index

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques Index
 

Contact Dr. Arbittier or Dr. Echols

 

 

Civil War Medical Collections 

 

Direct links to all medical & Civil War collections on this site                         

American Surgical Sets:

Pre-Civil War:  1 | 2  -   Post-Civil War:  3  -  Civil War 1861-1865:  4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   INDEX

Medical Text-Books:

1 | 1a | 2 | 2a | 3 | 3a | 4 | 4a | 5 | 5a | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 9a | 10 | 11 | 12    INDEX

Surgeon General's Office Library printed catalogues: 1840 | 1864 | 1865
Medical Lecture Cards: 1 | 2 | 34 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21    INDEX

Medical Faculty and Authors:

INDEX

Navy Surgeon Exams:

1863 Navy Surgeon Applicant Exams with Biographies   INDEX ONE | INDEX TWO

Surgeon CDVs, Images:

Army: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8    INDEX

Navy: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8   

Hosp Dep't Bottles, Tins, 

U.S. Army Pannier:

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

American Civil War Medicine & Surgical Antiques

Please request permission before commercial use or publication of any content or photos on this site and credit any use with:  "American Civil War Surgical Antiques"   All content and all original photography on this Web Site is copyrighted 1995 - 2015 and may not be used on any other web site or in commercial print without the expressed e-mail permission from Dr. Arbittier:  Contact   All rights reserved. 

 

Students doing reports or projects are welcome to use the content of this site without permission, but credits would be appreciated.

 

Please note: information on this site may not be normally referenced as this is an active and long-term educational research project.  Personal notes may not be properly cited for publication.  Various articles are digitally reproduced under the 'fair-use act' of the copyright laws and are intended for educational purposes only.  Many citations are from Google digital 'books' and can be traced backwards via a search of a unique string in the citation.

 

 Arbittier Museum of Medical History Tour:   1 | 2 | 3

 

Last update: Monday, December 12, 2016